http://instapedia.com/m/[search keyword]
PC Instapedia >>
English Wikipedia Results:

Canadian Army Trophy

Canadian Army Trophy
Canadian Army Trophy

The Canadian Army Trophy (CAT) was a tank gunnery competition established to foster excellence and competition among the armoured forces of the NATO countries in Western Europe.

The trophy itself is a miniature sterling silver replica of a Canadian Army Centurion tank.

Contents


Origins

First held in 1963, the event was so named for the hosts, the Canadian Army 4th Mechanized Brigade forward deployed in West Germany. It was decided to hold the competition every two years at Bergen-Hohne (also at Grafenwöhr starting in 1987), Germany, from 1963 to 1991. Each member country was invited to field a 'team' to represent their respective Corps, or, in case of Canada, their Army. Nations represented included Canada, Belgium, United Kingdom, the Netherlands, West Germany and the United States. Awards were given for best scoring team. Originally, each nation fielded a company of four platoons of 3 AFV's. This was changed in 1985 to each NATO Army Group fielding teams, either Northern Army Group (NORTHAG) or Central Army Group (CENTAG), and best scoring platoons of each Army Group. NORTHAG consisted of the British Army of the Rhine (BAOR)'s British I Corps, American III Corps Forward, German I Corps, 2 brigades of the Netherlands' Army, and 2 brigades of the Belgian Army. CENTAG consisted of the German II and III Corps, the American V and VII Corps, and the Canadian 4th Brigade.

CAT '79

In the 1979 competition held at Range 10 (built in 1978 for the CAT competition), Grafenwöhr. There were 20 platoons competing (4 from each country Belgium, Canada, the United Kingdom, the Netherlands, West Germany and the United States. The 3 MBT tank platoons were presented 24 targets. Scoring was based on target hits, hit times, ammunition bonuses (only if all targets were hit), and hit bonuses (only if all targets were hit), machine gun hits, and penalties with a maximum platoon score of 20,600 points. The main gun targets were at ranges between 1,600-3,000 meters and would collapse after being hit or when the presentation time had expired. No target would be presented twice, so the judges could actually count holes in the targets to verify target hits; "cookie bites" did not count as hits.

1979 was the first year that the USA team finished other than last place (4th place) - M Company, 3rd Squadron 2nd ACR - an especially noteworthy effort by Lieutenant's (later Captain) David Andersson, William Ewing, Howard Krause, and Randy Socha, - the M60A1 MBT being used by the USA entry were the oldest generation of tanks competing, and the last time M60A1 appeared in the competition.

CAT '85

Originally, each nation fielded a company of four platoons of 3 Armored Fighting Vehicles (AFV's, tanks). This was changed in 1985 to each NATO Army Group fielding teams, either Northern Army Group (NORTHAG) or Central Army Group (CENTAG), and best scoring platoons of each Army Group.

NORTHAG consisted of the British Army of the Rhine (BAOR)'s British I Corps, American III Corps Forward, German I Corps, 2 brigades of the Netherlands' Army, and 2 brigades of the Belgian Army. CENTAG consisted of the German II and III Corps, the American V and VII Corps, and the Canadian 4th Brigade.

CAT '87

In the 1987 competition held at Grafenwöhr, there were 24 platoons competing (12 from NORTHAG and 12 from CENTAG). NORTHAG fielded teams from Belgium, UK, the Netherlands, West Germany and the United States. CENTAG fielded teams from Canada, West Germany and the United States. The British (3-tank) tank platoons were presented 24 targets, while the other countries' 4-tank platoons were presented with 32 targets during the battle runs. Scoring was based on target hits, hit times, ammunition bonuses (only if all targets were hit), and hit bonuses (only if all targets were hit), machine gun hits, and penalties with a maximum platoon score of 20,600 points. The main gun targets were at ranges between 1,600-3,000 meters and would remain standing after being hit until presentation time had expired. No target would be presented twice, so the judges could actually count holes in the targets to verify target hits; "cookie bites" did not count as hits.

The failures of a nation's entrant to place well at the CAT have had considerable defence industry impact. The showing of the UK's Royal Hussars at the 1987 competition was the subject of a front page story in London's Sunday Telegraph, June 21, 1987, titled "NATO Allies Outgun Britain's New Battle Tanks".

CAT '87 Teams

Northern Army Group

Northern Army Group
Central Army Group
Central Army Group
3-64 Armor CAT'87 Patch
3-64 Armor CAT'87 Patch

NORTHAG
CENTAG

CAT '89

The 1989 competition was the first time that night battle runs were part of the competition. The Canadian 4th Mechanized Brigade left Germany in 1994, resulting in the end of the CAT competitions. In 1997 the competition began again, but only between the United States and Canada as the CANAM Cup.

Competition

From 1963 to 1991

Year Rank Unit Nation
1. 4e LANCIERS Belgium
2. PANZERBATAILLON 83 Germany
1963 3. 41 TANKBATALJON Netherlands
4. FORT GARRY HORSE Canada
5. 5th ROYAL TANK REGT United Kingdom
Year Rank Unit Nation
1. 4e LANCIER Belgium
2. PANZERBATAILLON 83 Germany
1964 3. 11th HUSSARS United Kingdom
4. 43 TANKBATALJON Netherlands
5. FORT GARRY HORSE Canada
Year Rank Unit Nation
1. THE ROYAL SCOTS GREYS United Kingdom
2. 4e LANCIERS Belgium
1965 3. FORT GARRY HORSE Canada
4. 11 TANKBATALJON Netherlands
5. PANZERBATAILLON 83 Germany
Year Rank Unit Nation
1. 13th/18th ROYAL HUSSARS CMO United Kingdom
2. 4e LANCIERS Belgium
1966 3. PANZERBATAILLON 324 Germany
4. LORD STRATHCONA’s HORSE (RC) Canada
5. 101 TANKBATALJON Netherlands
Year Rank Unit Nation
1. LORD STRATHCONA’s HORSE (RC) Canada
2. 15th/19th THE KING’s ROYAL HUSSARS United Kingdom
1967 3. 4e LANCIERS Belgium
4. PANZERBATAILLON 83 Germany
5. 41 TANKBATALJON Netherlands
Year Rank Unit Nation
1. 1er LANCIERS Belgium
2. PANZERBATAILLON 33 Germany
1968 3. THE ROYAL SCOTS GREYS United Kingdom
4. 43 TANKBATALJON Netherlands
5. LORD STRATHCONA’s HORSE (RC) Canada
Year Rank Unit Nation
1. 16th/5th QUEEN’s ROYAL LANCERS United Kingdom
1970 2. PANZERBATAILLON 33/34 Germany
3. LORD STRATHCONA’s HORSE (RC) Canada
Year Rank Unit Nation
1. PANZERBATAILLON 83 Germany
1973 2. QUEEN’s ROYAL IRISH HUSSARS United Kingdom
3. 11 TANKBATALJON Netherlands
Year Rank Unit Nation
1. PANZERBATAILLON 84 Germany
1975 2. ROYAL HUSSARS (Prince of Wales Own) United Kingdom
3. 2e LANCIERS Belgium
Year Rank Unit Nation
1. ROYAL CANADIAN DRAGOONS Canada
2. PANZERBATAILLON 64 Germany
1977 3. 1er LANCIERS Belgium
4. 17th/21st LANCERS United Kingdom
5. 11 TANKBATALJON Netherlands
6. 2nd BATTALION 81st ARMOR U.S.A.
Year Rank Unit Nation
1. PANZERBATAILLON 284 Germany
2. 2e LANCIERS Belgium
1979 3. 4th/7th ROYAL DRAGOON GUARDS United Kingdom
4. M Co. 3rd Squadron, 2nd ARMORED CAVALRY REGIMENT U.S.A.
5. ROYAL CANADIAN DRAGOONS Canada
Year Rank Unit Nation
1. PANZERBATAILLON 294 Germany
2. 2e LANCIERS Belgium
1981 3. 1st BATTALION 32nd ARMOR U.S.A.
4. ROYAL CANADIAN DRAGOONS Canada
5. QUEEN’s OWN HUSSARS United Kingdom
6. 41 TANKBATALJON Netherlands
Year Rank Unit Nation
1. CENTAG:
PANZERBATAILLON 2/293 Germany
PANZERBATAILLON 293 Germany
1st BATTALION 32nd ARMOR U.S.A.
3rd BATTALION 64th ARMOR U.S.A.
1983 ROYAL CANADIAN DRAGOONS Canada
2. NORTHAG:
4e LANCIERS Belgium
ROYAL SCOTS DRAGOON GUARDS United Kingdom
PANZERBATAILLON 74 Germany
11 TANKBATALJON Netherlands
2nd BATTALION 66th ARMOR U.S.A.
Year Rank Unit Nation
1. NORTHAG:
2e LANCIERS Belgium
2nd BATTALION 66th ARMOR U.S.A.
PANZERBATAILLON 24 Germany
43 TANKBATALJON Netherlands
1985 ROYAL SCOTS DRAGOON GUARDS United Kingdom
2. CENTAG:
3rd BATTALION 64th ARMOR U.S.A.
3rd BATTALION 32nd ARMOR U.S.A.
PANZERBATAILLON 63 Germany
ROYAL CANADIAN DRAGOONS Canada
PANZERBATAILLON 244 Germany
Year Rank Unit Nation
1. CENTAG:
4th BATTALION 8th CAVALRY U.S.A.
3rd BATTALION 64th ARMOR U.S.A.
ROYAL CANADIAN DRAGOONS Canada
PANZERBATAILLON 124 Germany
1987 PANZERBATAILLON 363 Germany
2. NORTHAG:
43 TANKBATALJON Netherlands
4e LANCIERS Belgium
THE ROYAL HUSSARS United Kingdom
2nd BATTALION 66th ARMOR U.S.A.
PANZERBATAILLON 324 Germany
Year Rank Unit Nation
1. NORTHAG:
41 TANKBATALJON Netherlands
PANZERBATAILLON 203 Germany
2e REGIMENT DE GUIDES Belgium
1989 3rd BATTALION 66th ARMOR U.S.A.
2. CENTAG:
PANZERBATAILLON 123 Germany
2nd BATTALION 64th ARMOR U.S.A.
8th CANADIAN HUSSARS Canada
4th BATTALION 32nd ARMOR U.S.A.
Year Rank Unit Nation
1. NORTHAG:
PANZERBATAILLON 84 Germany
43 TANKBATALJON Netherlands
1991 3e REGIMENT DE LANCIERS Belgiumn
2. CENTAG:
PANZERBATAILLON 153 Germany
8th CANADIAN HUSSARS Canada

See also

Notes and references

External links

de:Canadian Army Trophy


Canadian Army Occupation Force

The Canadian Army Occupation Force was created in 1945 as part of Canada's commitment to postwar Europe. The formation was formed on the organizational structure of a standard infantry division. The units were named after those in the 3rd Canadian Infantry Division.


Canadian Army Film and Photo Unit

Harold Marshall]], of the Calgary Highlanders Scout and Sniper Platoon, posed for Army photographer Ken Bell near Fort Brasschaet in Belgium, September 1944. (PAC) Lieutenant Ken Bell of the CFPU, who landed at Juno Beach on D-Day with The Highland Light Infantry of Canada

The Canadian Army Film and Photo Unit (CFPU) was a unit of the Canadian Army founded in 1941 in order to document military operations during World War II. It was the last unit of its kind to be founded by the Allied armies.

Among the campaigns which it recorded were the invasion of Sicily, the D-Day Landings, the liberation of Paris, and the Elbe River link up of the Allied armies, known as Elbe Day.

Among its members were Charles Roos, the first allied cameraman ashore on D-day, Al Calder, who parachuted over the Rhine, and Ken Bell, who landed at Juno Beach on D-Day with The Highland Light Infantry of Canada.

The CFPU was staffed by enlisted men and women. Its objectives were to film Canadian troops in action and supply the Department of National Defence, and also media outlets, with theatrical newsreels and still photographs.[1]

History

The first official Canadian army photographer was Lieutenant Laurie Audrain of Winnipeg, appointed on June 25th 1940. The CFPU was formed on June 19 1941, under the command of Captain William Abell of Winnipeg. By the end of World War II, fifty nine Canadian photographers and cameramen had been involved in combat operations in Europe. Of these, eighteen were wounded and six killed. [2]

The CFPU was the first Allied unit to provide film of the assault waves landing in Sicily and in Normandy, the first to get still pictures from Normandy onto the front pages of the world press, and the only one to produce colour pictures of Operation Overlord. [3]

In April 1945 the journalist Lionel Shapiro wrote in Maclean's magazine:

"CFPU men were in the thick of every battle, often moving with the most forward units, and on a few occasions positioning themselves at a vantage point in no-man's land in anticipation of a clash."[4]

Ken Bell's war photographs - taken with a Rolleiflex camera - are housed by Library and Archives Canada.[5], in Ottawa.

Modern era

In 2007, a documentary titled Shooters was made by James O'Regan, documenting the history of the CFPU.http:<ref>Shooters documentary website

Gallery

<gallery perrow="4"> File:Sergeant H.A. Marshall of the Sniper Section, The Calgary Highlanders.jpg File:Panzerschreck a169257-v6.jpg File:Royal Winnipeg Rifles - Spring.jpg File:Crowded beach at Courseulles-sur-Mer.jpg File:Highlanders44.jpg File:1st Canadian generals.jpg File:Wayne and Shuster.jpg </gallery>

References

External links

Notes